Jane E. Miller, Ph.D.

Miller_Jane


Professor
Research Professor, IHHCPAR
B.A. (Economics) Williams College; M.A. (Demography), University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. (Demography), University of Pennsylvania
Contact
  • Room 552, Civic Square Building
  • 112 Paterson Street, Room 454
  • (848) 932-6730
  • jem@rutgers.edu
Research Interests
  • Quantitative reasoning
  • Research communication
  • Health services research
  • Child health
  • Access to health care


Jane E. Miller (Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 1989) is a Professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, and (through 2019) Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. A specialist in quantitative reasoning and research communication, Dr. Miller has written two books: The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers and The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis, both in their second editions, and a series of related articles in teaching and research journals. She is currently working on a book titled Making Sense of Numbers: Quantitative Reasoning for the Social Sciences (Sage). Dr. Miller’s research interests include relationships between poverty, child health, health insurance, and access to health care. Her recent research concerns factors associated with time burden and unmet medical need for families of children with chronic health conditions. Collaborating with colleagues at the Center for State Health Policy and New Jersey’s Department of Human Services, she conducted several studies of New Jersey’s State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) on issues related to program retention, chronic childhood illness, and other issues. Dr. Miller received a Faculty Scholar’s Award from the William T. Grant Foundation for her work on poverty dynamics and child well-being. She is a faculty associate at both the Center for Research on Child Well-Being at Princeton University, and the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research. From 2008-2018, she was the Faculty Director of Project L/Earn, an intensive social science health research training internship program for undergraduates with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s program on Building Human Capital (2008-16) and the National Science Foundation’s “Research Experiences for Undergraduates” program (2016-18). Dr. Miller received the Faculty Mentor of the Year Award from Rutgers’ Aresty Research Center for Undergraduates in 2007 and a Leaders in Faculty Diversity award from Rutgers University in 2010.

Complete Curriculum Vitae (C.V.)

View all course offerings and related syllabi
Undergraduate
  • Research Methods
Graduate
  • Communicating Quantitative Information

Recent Publications

Books

  • 2015: J.E. Miller, 2015. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers, 2nd Edition. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Articles in Refereed Journals

  • 2016: J.E. Miller, C. Nugent, and L.B. Russell. 2016. “How Much Time Do Families Spend on the Health Care of Children with Diabetes?” Diabetes Therapy. 7(3): Online first: DOI: 10.1007/s13300-016-0181-z.
  • J.E. Miller, C. Nugent, and L.B. Russell. 2016. “How Much Time Do Families Spend on the Health Care of Children with Diabetes?” Diabetes Therapy. 7(3): Online first: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13300-016-0181-z 
  • 2015: J.E. Miller, C. Nugent, and L.B. Russell. 2015. “Risk Factors for Family Time Burdens Arranging and Providing Health Care for Children
    with Special Health Care Needs: Lessons from Nonproportional Odds Models.” Social Science Research. 52 (2015) 602–614.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ssresearch.2015.04.003
  • 2014: J.E. Miller, C. Nugent, and L.B. Russell. 2014. “Which Components of Medical Homes Reduce Time Burden for Families of Children with Special Health Care Needs?” Health Services Research, Online ahead of print: doi: 10.1111/1475-6773.12215.

Other Publications

  • 2015: J.E. Miller, and Davis, D.M. 2015. ” Project L/EARN Alumni Characteristics, Graduate School and Professional Accomplishments, 1991-
    2014 Cohorts: A Report Based on the Tracking and Evaluation Database.” Report to the Human Capital Portfolio of the Robert Wood Johnson
    Foundation. Princeton NJ.
  • 2015: D.M. Mouzon, J.E. Miller, T.M. Simpson, D.M. Davis, and R. Perry. 2015. “Instructional and Administrative Materials for Project L/EARN
    Undergraduate Research Training Program.” Produced for the Human Capital Portfolio of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Princeton
    NJ.
  • 2015: J.E. Miller, Guarnaccia, P.G., Mouzon, D.M., Davis, D.M., Perry, R., and T.M. Simpson. 2015. “Project L/EARN Undergraduate
    Research Training Model Dissemination Workshop Materials.” Produced for the Human Capital Portfolio of the Robert Wood Johnson
    Foundation. Princeton NJ.

Latest Book and Videos

J.E. Miller, 2013. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis, 2nd Edition. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press [includes lecture slides, spreadsheet templates, video lectures and data sets]

Visit Website

Study guide

Suggestions for instructors

  • J.E. Miller, 2015. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers, 2nd Edition. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. University of Chicago Press.
  • J.E. Miller, 2004. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Numbers. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. University of Chicago Press.
  • J.E. Miller, 2006. “How to Communicate Statistical Findings: An Expository Writing Approach.” Chance. 19(4):43-49.
  • J.E. Miller, 2010. “Quantitative Literacy across the Curriculum: Integrating Skills from English Composition, Mathematics, and the Substantive Disciplines.” The Educational Forum. 74(4):334-46. Recommended for middle school and high school teachers.
  • J.E. Miller, 2013. “Getting to Know your Variables: An Exercise to Prepare Students to Undertake Data Analysis.” Working paper, Rutgers University.
  • J.E. Miller, 2008. “Contributions of Expository Writing to Numeric Communication: Guidelines for Writing up Word Problems.” Working paper, Rutgers University. Recommended for middle school and high school teachers.
  • J.E. Miller, 2007. “Organizing Data in Tables and Charts: Different Criteria for Different Tasks.” Teaching Statistics. 29(3):98-101.
  • J.E. Miller, 2007. “Preparing and Presenting Effective Research Posters.” Health Services Research. Volume 42(1):311-328, with appendixes online.
    • PDF
    • Overview of preparing and presenting posters – Watch Video
    • Designing effective slides and poster pages – Watch Video
    • Comparison of paper, speech and poster – Watch Video
    • Presenting statistical results to non-statistical audiences – Watch Video

  • J.E. Miller, 2013. The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis, 2nd Edition. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. Chicago: University of Chicago Press [includes lecture slides, spreadsheet templates, video lectures and data sets]
  • J.E. Miller, 2005.The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis. The Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing and Publishing. University of Chicago Press.
  • J.E. Miller and L. Wu. 2009. “Teaching How to Write about Multivariate Analysis: Suggested Courses and Exercises.” Working paper, Rutgers University.
  • J.E. Miller and Y.V. Rodgers, 2008. “Economic Importance and Statistical Significance: Guidelines for Communicating Empirical Research.” Feminist Economics. 14(2): 117-149.
  • J.E. Miller, 2005. “Presenting Statistical Results to Non-statistical Audiences.” (See also Chapter 16 in The Chicago Guide to Writing about Multivariate Analysis, University of Chicago Press.)
  • J.E. Miller, 2008. “The Goldilocks Principle: Avoiding Pitfalls in Interpretation of Regression Coefficients.” Social Science Research Network (SSRN) eLibrary.
  • J.E. Miller, 2008. “Interpreting the Substantive Significance of Regression Coefficients.” 2008 Proceedings of the American Statistical Association, Statistical Education Section [CD-ROM], Alexandria, VA: American Statistical Association.
  • J.E. Miller, 2008. “Writing about Hazards Models: Practical Guidelines for Effective Presentation.” Working paper, Rutgers University; version with examples from medicine and public health.
  • J.E. Miller, 2008. “Writing about Hazards Models: Practical Guidelines for Effective Presentation.” Working paper, Rutgers University;version with examples from economics.
  • J.E. Miller, 2007. “Presenting Quantitative Research Results,” Chapter 42 in: G.J. Miller and K. Yang, editors: Handbook of Research Methods in Public Administration, 2nd edition. Philadelphia: Taylor & Francis, Inc. pp. 861-878.

General tools for students investigating careers and applying for jobs or graduate school

Template to help organize materials for your letter writers (e.g., references for internships, jobs, or graduate school)

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook

Search the Occupational Outlook Handbook web site to learn more about careers you are considering.

  • Quick facts on each occupation class
    • Median pay
    • Entry level education required
    • Work experience
    • On-the job training
    • # of expected jobs
    • Job growth (% and #) 2010-2010
  • Detailed information
    • What they do
    • Work environment
    • How to become one
    • Pay
    • Similar occupations (cross-linked); good way to learn about alternatives so you can compare them in terms of responsibilities, skills and training, pay, etc

 Tools for students applying to graduate school

Recommended book:
Asher, Donald.  2008. Graduate Admissions Essays: Write your Way into the Graduate School of your Choice, 3rd edition. Berkeley, CA: Ten Speed Press. Available through amazon.combarnesandnoble.com, and other vendors
Chapters on:

  • Should you go to grad school, and how are you going to pay for this?
  • Choosing a school or program
  • Planning and managing your application
  • Three chapters on writing essays
  • Sample essays
  • Letters of recommendation

Graduate school comparison grid: Template to help you

  • Identify information to collect about programs you are considering
    • Basic program information (university, degree type, web site, contact information)
      • Application information (prerequisites; # letters; common application)
    • Fit of the program with your interests
    • Funding
  • Select a range of schools based on likelihood of admission (backup, solid, and reach; see Asher book for definitions)
  • Organize your application process (deadlines, action status)

Areas of Expertise: Statistical Research Methods