“City Cycling”—Cycling Because It’s Faster

August 10, 2012

John Pucher and Ralph Buehler’s soon-to-be-released book, City Cycling, has just about everything you can imagine in it when it comes to cycling. With topics ranging from cycling trends to cycling safety to cycling infrastructure to the integration of cycling with public transportation, it’s going to be the bible of cycling. The European Cyclists’ Foundation recently interviewed Dr. Paul Tranter, an Associate Professor in geography in the School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences at the Canberra campus of the University of New South Wales, located in the Australian Defence Force Academy, about his chapter on the surprising amount of time saved when commuting by bicycle.

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Many cyclists already know they are faster than cars, particularly in peak hour traffic. Yet even cyclists may be surprised at how much time bicycles can save in any city when all time costs are considered. Dr. Paul Tranter, who has written a chapter in the upcoming “City Cycling” book, tells us why. 

You may already know it, but in most cities throughout the world, cycling is a “faster” mode of transportation than the car.  But for those that still aren’t convinced, it’s time to learn about “effective speed”.

“Effective speed is calculated using the standard formula: speed equals distance divided by time.  Time here includes not only the time spent moving; it also includes the time devoted to enabling the movement to occur,” explains Dr. Paul Tranter, a geography Professor at the University of New South Wales, and an author from the upcoming City Cycling book.

Read more at the ECF website

 

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