Seymour – Corporate Landlords and Pandemic and Prepandemic Evictions in Las Vegas

Professor Eric Seymour’s latest research examines trends in evictions and filings associated with two particular submarkets, extended-stay and single-family rentals, through an analysis of case-level data covering the Las Vegas metropolitan area

Abstract

Research on evictions has found that large landlords are associated with higher absolute and relative numbers of evictions, and pandemic-period filings have brought additional scrutiny to large landlords and corporate landlords in particular. However, not all large landlords are equivalent, and some may be more likely to evict based on the submarkets in which they operate, and the pandemic has likely altered these relationships. This study examines trends in evictions and filings associated with two particular submarkets, extended-stay and single-family rentals, through an analysis of case-level data covering the Las Vegas metropolitan area. Through a series of multivariate analyses, I find that extended-stay properties are associated with higher eviction rates than other multifamily properties during the 12-month period immediately preceding the pandemic. Extended-stay landlords are even more likely to file and evict during the first 12-months of the pandemic. The results are mixed for single-family rentals. Corporate and other large landlords are generally more likely to file and evict prior to the pandemic, but several are no more likely or even far less likely to evict compared to smaller landlords during the pandemic. This study concludes with implications for policy and research.

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