Concentrations

Urban Planning and Policy Development Concentrations

Six issue-oriented concentrations, or specialties, reflect the strengths of the faculty in the Urban Planning and Policy Development program. These concentrations go beyond the broad foundation of the core requirements to explore more deeply the scope of specific planning issues. They allow more detailed examinations of the dimensions, questions, conflicts, and impacts addressed by the professional as well as by the researcher. They encourage recognition of common elements that resonate between and among various problems, policies, and programs.

Courses in each concentration are grouped into “required” and “recommended” categories. The program requires that any student who wants to specialize in a particular area take courses as outlined under each concentration. Additional courses taken in that area will depend upon the student’s particular interest and can be selected, with the help of advisers, from among the listed recommended and relevant courses or from other courses recommended by area advisers.

These concentrations cover areas of substantial strength within the program and school. There also are other feasible concentrations, such as information technology. Students who want to blend two concentrations (e.g., urban informatics, GIS, and more) to design their own programs can do so and should speak with their faculty adviser and the concentration coordinators.  Students may also design a custom concentration (e.g., urban informatics, GIS, and more) with their adviser’s support.  All required and most recommended courses for these concentrations are offered through the program and other units of the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy.

Additional recommended courses are offered within the university in the Departments of Landscape Architecture; Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics; Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources; Environmental Sciences; and Geography, among others. Courses also may be found at Princeton University and New Jersey Institute of Technology.  We have reciprocal arrangements with these two schools.

Download Program in Urban Planning and Policy Development brochure

Areas of Concentration:

Community Development and Housing Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Kathe Newman (Co-Coordinator), James DeFilippis (Co-Coordinator), Radha Jagannathan, Robert Lake, Julia Sass Rubin, Eric SeymourMi Shih

Overview

The community development and housing concentration exposes students to the practices and theory of community development and housing.  Course work examines: the history and practice of community development; the processes that shape urban change; the operations of housing markets and housing finance; the ways in which affordable housing is built and maintained; participatory and community planning methods; issues of gender, race, class, and power; and social and economic policy formation, implementation, and evaluation. This concentration meets the needs of students with a range of interests including community and community economic development and finance, housing development and rehabilitation, community planning and revitalization, urban poverty, and health. Students take at least two of the required courses and at least four courses total in the concentration.  Recommended methods courses include Advanced Qualitative Methods (34:833:628) and Introduction to Geographic Information Systems for Planners (34:970:591).  A graduate planning studio in community development is recommended as an additional course.

Required Courses(choose at least two of these courses)

34:970:562 Community Economic Development (spring)
34:970:563 Community Development (fall)
34:970:528 Housing Economics and Markets (spring 20, alt years)
34:970:529 Principles of Housing (fall)

Recommended Courses (choose at least two additional courses, which can include the two required courses you did not choose above, for a total of four)

34:970:521 Historic Preservation (spring)
34:970:522 International Historic Preservation (spring)
34:970:530 International Urbanization and Housing Issues (fall)
34:970:532 Bridging Public Health and Urban Planning (spring)
34:970:561 Social Justice in Planning and Public Policy (spring 20, alt years)
34:970:594 Program Evaluation (prereq BQM; Discrete Methods or Multivariate Methods)(fall)
34:970:606 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis (fall)
34:970:622 Urban Redevelopment (fall)
34:970:XXX History and Theory of Urban Redevelopment (spring 21, alt years)
34:833:513 Issues in Health Disparities (spring)
34:833:540 State and Local Public Finance (spring)
34:833:570 Non-profit Management (fall)
34:833:585 American Social Policy (fall)
34:833:595 Economics of Poverty (fall)
34:833:612 Non-profit and Community Development Finance (spring)
34:833:686 Community Organizing (fall)
34:833:XXX Education Policy, Community Development and Social Justice (spring)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

Sociology
920:571 Space, Place, Inequality
920:573 Community Inequality
920:614 Race, Ethnicity, and Inequality

Graduate Certificates

Students in this concentration may be interested in graduate certificates in Historic Preservation, Real Estate Development and Redevelopment, Geospatial Information Science, Human Dimensions of Environmental Change, and Coastal Climate Risk and Resilience.

Design and Development/Redevelopment Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Tony Nelessen (co-coordinator), David Listokin (co-coordinator), Barbara FagaJuan Ayala

Overview

This concentration includes two tracks: (1) Urban Design and (2) Development /Redevelopment. Because of the connections between these two topics, many courses are listed in both tracks. Students may choose to combine these two tracks for a custom concentration.

Urban Design Track

The Urban Design track focuses on the visioning, planning and design of neighborhoods and developments. Urban design courses equip students with the skills to create and communicate future forms of urban development/redevelopment. The design sequence provides basic knowledge of urban design principles and practice, as well as site design techniques.  The graphics curriculum illustrates basic and advanced skills in graphic production and demonstrates the various graphics behind a successful urban planning project.  Students develop the confidence to interact with students, faculty, clients and public officials on real-world issues after successfully completing this sequence of courses. Graphical Communication for Planners (34:970:590) is the required methods course. Recommended methods courses include Introduction to GIS for Planners (34:970:591) and Topics in GIS (34:970:592).  The Urban Design studio is strongly recommended (prerequisites: 590, 600 and 601).  Other graduate planning studios covering the following topics are recommended: housing, urban redevelopment, neighborhood revitalization and community development.

Required Courses (take all of these courses)
34:970:590 Graphical Communication for Planners (1st year, fall)
34:970:593 Advanced Graphical Communication (fall)
34:970:600 Planning and Design I (1st year, fall, pre- or co-req: 34:970:590)
34:970:601 Planning and Design II (1st year, spring, pre-req: 34:970:600 or instructor approval)
34:970:602 Zoning for Urban Planning (fall)
34:970:606 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis (fall)

Recommended Courses
34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning (spring)
34:833:572 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (spring)
34:970:520 Planning and Land Use Administration (spring)
34:970:521 Historic Preservation (spring)
34:970:523 Environmental Law and Policy (spring)
34:970:551 Transportation and Land Use (spring)
34:970:552 Transportation and Environment (fall, alt years)
34:970:572 Green Building (spring, alt years)
34:970:604 Land Development Practice (spring, alt years)
34:970:620 Energy Sustainability and Policy (spring)
34:970:622 Urban Redevelopment (fall)

Development/Redevelopment Track

A broad understanding of real estate development and redevelopment, including land, building, market and financial analysis, particularly in the United States, is gained through a sequence of courses in development/redevelopment planning and practice; real estate, finance, investment; and development impact analysis.  This track meets the needs of students with varying interests, including planning for development/redevelopment, real estate market research and analysis, real estate finance and investment analysis, and relating land use planning and controls to the private development process. It is strongly recommended that students take at least one studio in urban redevelopment, neighborhood revitalization, urban design, housing, or community development.

Required Courses: (take all of these courses)
34:970:606 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis (fall)
34:970:622 Urban Redevelopment (fall)

Recommended Courses (choose at least two additional courses for a total of four)
34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning (spring)
34:970:520 Planning and Land Use Administration (spring)
34:970:521 Historic Preservation (spring)
34:920:522 International Historic Preservation (spring)
34:970:523 Environmental Law and Policy (spring)
34:970:528 Housing Economics and Markets (spring 19, alt years)
34:970:529 Principles of Housing (fall)
34:970:551 Transportation and Land Use (spring)
34:970:552 Transportation and Environment (fall, alt years)
34:970:563 Community Development (fall)
34:970:572 Green Building (spring 20, alt years)
34:970:590 Graphical Communication for Planners (1st year, fall)
34:970:600 Planning and Design I (1st year, fall, pre- or co-req of 34:970:590)
34:970:601 Planning and Design II (spring, pre-req: 34:970:600)
34:970:602 Zoning for Urban Planning (fall)
34:970:604 Land Development Practice (spring, alt. years)
34:970:620 Energy Sustainability and Policy (spring)
34:970:XXX History and Theory of Urban Redevelopment (spring 21, alt years)
34:833:540 State & Local Public Finance (spring)
34:833:572 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (spring)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

(may substitute for any recommended course at Bloustein, with concentration coordinator’s approval)
Students should check courses in these (and other) programs: Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies (CHAPS) at Rutgers, New Brunswick; real estate program at the Rutgers Business School, Newark and Piscataway; design in the Department of Landscape Architecture at Rutgers, New Brunswick (design background required).

Graduate Certificates

Students in this concentration may be interested in graduate certificates in Historic Preservation, Real Estate Development and Redevelopment, and Geospatial Information Science.

Environmental, Human Health and Land Use Planning Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Clinton Andrews (Coordinator), Michael Greenberg, Frank Popper, Eric SeymourLyna Wiggins

Overview

This concentration divides into two tracks: (1) Environmental and Human Health Planning and (2) Land Use Planning. Because of the connections between these two topics, many courses are listed in both tracks.  Students may choose to combine these two tracks for a custom concentration.

This concentration prepares students to plan and manage the human-environment interface. The Environmental and Human Health Planning track focuses on the application of management and policy tools to reduce anthropogenic environmental impacts, mitigate natural hazards, and improve human health outcomes. The Land Use Planning track emphasizes land-use planning, master planning, and zoning regulation at the scale of towns, cities, and states. All students in this concentration will develop familiarity with design, regulatory and managerial approaches. Recommended Methods courses include Graphical Communication for Planners (34:970:590), Introduction to GIS for Planning and Policy (34:970:591), and Topics in GIS (34:970:592). At least one graduate planning studio in environmental, comprehensive planning or other physical planning is strongly recommended.

Environmental and Human-Health Planning Track

Required Courses (take three of these courses)
34:970:618 Environmental Planning and Management I (fall)
34:970:XXX Hazard Mitigation Planning: Prevention, Resilience and Sustainability (spring)
34:970:619 Environmental Economics and Policy (spring 21, alt years)
34:970:571 Industrial Ecology (spring)
34:970:619 Bridging Public Health and Urban Planning (spring)
34:970:631 Communicating Science to Decision makers (spring)

Recommended Courses (choose at least one additional course, which can include the required courses you did not choose above, for a total of four courses)
34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning (spring)
34:970:523 Environmental Law and Policy (spring)
34:970:550 Introduction to Transportation (fall)
34:970:551 Transportation and Land Use (spring)
34:970:552 Transportation and the Environment (fall, alt years)
34:970:553 Methods of Transportation Planning (spring)
34:970:556 Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning (fall, alt years)
34:970:572 Green Building (spring 20, alt years)
34:970:620 Energy Sustainability and Policy (spring)
34:970:621 Infrastructure Planning (spring)
34:970:667 Planning and Land Use Administration (spring)
34:833:572 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (spring)
34:501:520 Population Health (fall, spring)

Land Use Planning Track

Required Courses (take all of these courses)
34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning (spring)
34:970:602 Zoning for Urban Planning (fall)
34:970:667 Planning and Land Use Administration (spring)

Recommended Courses (choose at least one additional course for a total of 4 courses)
34:970:521 Historic Preservation (spring)
34:970:523 Environmental Law and Policy (spring)
34:970:529 Principles of Housing (fall)
34:970:550 Introduction to Transportation (fall)
34:970:551 Transportation and Land Use (spring)
34:970:552 Transportation and the Environment (fall, alt years)
34:970:553 Methods of Transportation Planning (spring)
34:970:556 Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning (fall, alt years)
34:970:563 Community Development (fall)
34:970:572 Green Building (spring 20, alt years)
34:970:600 Planning and Design I (fall) (pre- or co-req of 34:970:590)
34:970:601 Planning and Design II (spring)
34:970:604 Land Development Practice (spring)
34:970:606 Real Estate Finance and Investment Analysis (fall)
34:970:618 Environmental Planning and Management (fall)\
34:970:XXX Hazard Mitigation Planning: Prevention, Resilience and Sustainability (spring)
34:970:619 Environmental Economics and Policy (spring 21, alt years)
34:970:621 Infrastructure Planning (spring)
34:970:622 Urban Redevelopment (fall)
34:816:637 Global Data Analytics (fall)
34:833:572 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (spring)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

Geography
16:450:370 Climate Change and Society (spring)
16:450:508 Environment and Development
16:450:605 Geography Seminar: Environmental Change Topics (occasional)
16:450:606 Geography Seminar: Integrated Land Use Change (occasional)
16:450:612 Natural Hazards (co-listed as undergrad course 01:450:311)(fall undergrad)

Landscape Architecture
11:550:431 Advanced Landscape Architecture (studio course, requires design background)
11:372:444 Watershed Management: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

Environmental Science
Students with appropriate backgrounds (chemistry and calculus typically required) should consider these courses (and others) in the Department of Environmental Science.
16:375:530 Hazardous Waste Management
16:375:534 Environmental Sustainability: Life-Cycle Assessment Tools

Political Science
16:790:580 Global Environmental Politics and the United Nations (Political Science) (online)

Graduate Certificates

Students in this concentration may be interested in graduate certificates in Human Dimensions of Environmental Change, Historic Preservation, Coastal Climate Risk and Resilience, Energy and Geospatial Information Science.

International Development Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Radha Jagannathan and Hal Salzman (Co-coordinators), Hooshang Amirahmadi, Frances Barchi,  Michael Lahr, Ronald QuincyMi Shih

Overview

This concentration prepares students to effectively frame and engage with the dynamic challenges of designing and implementing plans and public policies in regional and international settings, with particular focus on urbanization and human settlement systems. Specific topics include the interplay of development and the presence and absence of political stability, social cohesion and social movements, economic equity, environmental sustainability, the spatial concentration of economic activity, inter-industry linkages, technology transfer, sustainable development, green economic growth, Sustainable Development Goals, and cross-boundary movement of people, trade, capital, and information. Students must take two of the required courses and at least four within the concentration.

Required Courses (take at least two of these courses)
34:970:530 International Urbanization and Housing Issues (fall)
34:970:633 Demography and Population Studies (not offered 19-20)
34:970:644 International Economic Development (spring)
34:970:645 Regional Development (fall, not offered fall 19) 

Recommended Courses (choose at least two of these courses, which can include the required courses you did not choose above, for a total of four courses)
34:970:522 International Historical Preservation (spring)
34:970:609 Social Policy in Developing Nations (not offered 19-20)
34:816:637 Global Data Analytics (fall)
34:970:646 International Infrastructure Development (fall)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

You may substitute one of these courses for one of the two recommended courses

Political Science

16:790:536 International Law and the United Nations (fall, spring)
16:790:580 Global Environmental Politics and the United Nations (fall) (online)

Social Work
19:910:545 Global Social Work and Social Development (spring)
19:910:549 Latinos: Culture, Community and Social Welfare (spring)

Women’s Studies
16:988:535 Gender and Human Rights (spring)

Global Affairs
26:475:504 International Law (fall)
26:478:541 Global Political Economy (fall)

Urban Systems
26:977:617 Urban Systems III: Globalization, International Migration, and Contemporary Cities (fall)

Note that since graduate course offerings throughout the University change annually, there may be relevant courses in cognate fields (or at the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton) which could be approved by one of the faculty coordinators for inclusion in the concentration. Students may also take a Directed Study relevant to their specific interests as one of the recommended courses.

International Development and Global Affairs at the Bloustein School

The International Development Interest Group (IDIG), was established at the Bloustein School in early 2009 and in 2010 was recognized as by the Graduate Student Association. It functions as a forum for the exchange of ideas and information, as well as a platform for collaborative work around various themes and geographies of relevance in planning and policy work in low- and middle-income countries.   https://bloustein.rutgers.edu/idig

Rutgers Global 

Rutgers Global—provides Rutgers community members with the opportunities, programs, resources, and services they need to advance their global experience.  http://global.rutgers.edu/ 

Other Global Initiatives at Rutgers 

Rutgers Global Health Institute fosters collaboration across the university and with partners beyond Rutgers to improve the health of vulnerable populations. Promotes health equity locally and around the world by working with communities to create and implement comprehensive, long-term solutions to pressing global health challenges.

Rutgers Climate Institute
https://climatesociety.rutgers.edu/
Rutgers Climate Institute is a University-wide effort understand climate change.

Transportation Policy and Planning Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Robert Noland (Co-Coordinator) and Michael Smart (Co-Coordinator), Kelcie RalphPiyushimita Thakuriah

Overview

The transportation policy and planning concentration provides a broad survey of the field as well as a critical evaluation of current and alternative policies and practical application of planning methods. Urban transport systems are examined in the context of environmental, energy, safety, equity, financial, and health impacts. Particular focus is placed on public transit planning, non-motorized modes such as walking and bicycling, environmental issues, and the coordination of land use and transportation planning. Students must take three of the seven core courses, and choose one elective from either the other core courses or from the listing of recommended courses below for a total of four courses. Students are encouraged to consider a Directed Study which may substitute for one recommended course.  Recommended methods courses include Introduction to GIS for Planning and Public Policy (34:970:591), Topics in GIS (34:970:592), and Discrete Choice Methods (34:970:630).  A graduate planning studio with a transportation focus or component is strongly recommended.

Required Courses (take at least three of these courses)
34:970:550 Introduction to Transportation (fall)
34:970:551 Transportation and Land Use (spring)
34:970:552 Transportation and the Environment (fall, alt year)
34:970:553 Methods of Transportation Planning (spring)
34:970:554 Transportation Economics and Finance (spring, alt year)
34:970:555 Transportation and Equity (fall, alt year)
34:970:556 Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning (fall, alt year)
34:970:558 Public Transit Planning and Management (fall)

Recommended Courses (choose one additional course, which can include the required courses you did not choose above, or other courses with approval from the concentration coordinators, for a total of four courses)
34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning (spring)
34:970:559 Transportation Risk and Security (spring)
34:970:560 Freights and Ports (spring)
34:970:590 Graphical Communication for Planners (1st year, fall)
34:970:594 Program Evaluation (fall)
34:970:600 Planning and Design I (fall) (pre- or co-req of 34:970:590)
34:970:618 Environmental Planning and Management (fall)
34:970:619 Environmental Economics and Policy (spring, every other year)
34:970:634 Big Data Analytics (spring)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

Civil and Environmental Engineering (these course offerings may change from year to year)
16:180:531 Traffic Engineering
16:180:532 Transportation Planning
16:180:533 Traffic Operations
16:180:537 Intelligent Transportation Systems
16:180:539 Advanced Transportation Economics and Modeling
16:180:554 Sustainable Transportation Infrastructure

Graduate Certificates

Students in this concentration may be interested in the Graduate Certificate in Transportation Studies and the Graduate Certificate in Transportation Management: Vulnerability, Risk, and Security.

Urban Informatics Concentration

Faculty Advisers

Clinton Andrews (Coordinator), Juan Ayala, Frank FelderMichael LahrRobert NolandEric SeymourMichael SmartPiyushimita Thakuriah,  Lyna Wiggins

Overview

Evidence-based decision making in urban planning requires the use of advanced computational tools and data management techniques that can evaluate the data generated in public settings. This concentration provides the vehicle for educating this new cross-trained professional cohort by providing competencies needed in urban informatics: context, statistics, programming, data management, data analytics, visualization, spatial analysis, applications and integration of skills.

Prior Preparation

This concentration is suitable for students with undergraduate degrees in any field.  Applicants must demonstrate competency in one or more programming languages and skills in data management (with coursework, work experience, or by examination). Basic Quantitative Methods and Planning Methods may be taken concurrently with concentration courses. Students with appropriate backgrounds may substitute more advanced courses for topics already mastered (see Methods Flowchart and consult with your adviser).

Required Courses (take three of these courses)
34:970:502 Theory and Practice of Public Informatics (fall)
34:970:591 Intro to GIS for Planning (fall, spring)
34:833:633 Data Analytics: Using Big Data (fall 2019, spring 2020), pre req: Applied Multivariate Methods (34:970:527) or Discrete Choice (34:970:630).

Recommended Courses (choose one additional course for a total of four courses)
34:970:527 Applied Multivariate Methods (fall, spring)
34:970:590 Graphical Communication for Planners (fall, spring)
34:970:592 Topics in GIS (fall, spring)
34:970:607 Communicating Quantitative Information (fall)
34:970:630 Discrete Choice Methods (spring)
34:970:631 Communicating Science with Decision Makers (spring)
34:970:659 Advanced Graphical Communication for Planners (fall)
34:833:635 Survey Research (fall)
34:816:637 Global Data Analytics (fall)

Recommended Courses in other Programs

Geography
16:450:615 Seminar in Remote Sensing (spring, every other year, offered in 2020, 2022)

Master of Business and Science
16:137:531 Introduction to User Experience Design
16:137:538 Database and Data Warehousing
16:137:550 Fundamentals of Analytics and Discovery Informatics
16:137:552 Python Methodologies
16:137:553 Business Intelligence with Visual Analytics
16:137:561 Fundamentals of Cybersecurity and Secure Systems

School of Communication and Information
17:610:559 Web Programming

Graduate Certificates

Students in this concentration may be interested in the graduate certificate in Geospatial Information Science.

Students who enrolled prior to Fall 2016 may have different requirements. Speak to your adviser.